College for Appalachian

$ 40.00

Author: P. David Searles

Alice Spencer Geddes Lloyd was a New England woman with a mission in life. In 1916 she settled on Caney Creek in Eastern Kentucky, determined to bring higher education to this remote corner of Appalachia. The school she founded, now Alice Lloyd College, continues to serve the area and its people and to stand as a tribute to Lloyd’s remarkable energy, determination, and vison.

Lloyd’s program combined a rigorous academic curriculum with an intense effort to instill a sense of service in the school’s graduates. This education was provided free and required only that the students abide by Lloyd’s very strict rule of conduct and pledge to remain in the mountains after graduating.

In the first full-scale study of Lloyd’s life and work and the institution she founded, David Searles shows how this courageous and complex woman struggled throughout her long life against seemingly insurmountable odds to create an institution dedicated to improving life in Appalachia. But, as he acknowledges, not all of Lloyd’s effort were benign. Her fundraising activities, though remarkably successful, relied on harmful stereotypes that caused resentment among her mountain neighbors. Her single-minded effort to win support for her programs and her refusal to accept opinions contrary to her own angered many others working in the mountains. She was a determined administrator who could appear arbitrary, in sensitive, and late in life, even reactionary.

But the significance of Lloyd’s life goes beyond the facts of her achievement. Despite the negative aspects of Lloyd’s activities,