Kentucky Weather

$ 19.95

It is said of just about every state: "If you don't like the weather, stick around. It'll change." In Kentucky, however, this time-worn cliché carries more than a grain of truth. Weather and its vagaries are an obsession in the state, not only because the commonwealth relies heavily on weather-sensitive industries such as agriculture, transportation, and tourism, but also because weather changes are indeed frequent and often abrupt.

In Kentucky Weather, meteorologist Jerry Hill explains how the atmosphere creates Kentucky's weather, and he provides insights into what conditions affect temperature, precipitation, storms, drought, and other aspects of the state's climate. He links the state's volatile weather history to the creation of its rich coalfields and explains how past ice ages helped form Kentucky's fertile farmland.

Additionally, the book examines tools and techniques for measuring and predicting weather and recounts the lore and superstitions associated with weather phenomena. Hill also discusses key weather events in Kentucky's history. He describes the rainstorm that saved pioneers from an Indian attack on Fort Boonesboro in 1778; the Great Flood of 1937; the devastating tornado outbreak of April 1974, when twenty-seven tornadoes raced across the state in a single day; and the severe ice storm that crippled much of central Kentucky in 2003.

Illustrated with photographs of noteworthy weather events with tables, charts and graphs detailing everything from record high and low temperatures to statistics on tornadoes, snowfall, and thunderstorms, Kentucky Weather is filled with significant and unusual facts in the history of the Bluegrass State's changeable climate.